Cary Gabriel Costello, "Intersex and Trans* Communities: Sex and Gender Struggles"

October 23, 2014
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Location
0207 Koffolt Labs

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2014-10-23 16:00:00 2014-10-23 17:30:00 Cary Gabriel Costello, "Intersex and Trans* Communities: Sex and Gender Struggles"

Cary Gabriel Costello is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of LGBT+ Studies at the University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee.  Prof. Costello holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  Ze researches and teaches in the areas of sex and gender, sociology of the body, medical sociology, sexuality and intersectional identity.  Prof. Costello is an advocate and speaker on LGBTQIA issues, and blogs on intersex and trans gender issues.  An intersex individual, Prof. Costello was assigned female at birth, and transitioned to male in later adulthood.  Ze is married to an intersex woman who was assigned male at birth, and is the gestational father of a teenaged daughter.  Prof. Costello may be addressed using the pronouns ze/zir/zim or he/his/him

 
Suggested blog readings:
0207 Koffolt Labs Womens Gender and Sexuality Studies wgss@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Cary Gabriel Costello is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of LGBT+ Studies at the University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee.  Prof. Costello holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  Ze researches and teaches in the areas of sex and gender, sociology of the body, medical sociology, sexuality and intersectional identity.  Prof. Costello is an advocate and speaker on LGBTQIA issues, and blogs on intersex and trans gender issues.  An intersex individual, Prof. Costello was assigned female at birth, and transitioned to male in later adulthood.  Ze is married to an intersex woman who was assigned male at birth, and is the gestational father of a teenaged daughter.  Prof. Costello may be addressed using the pronouns ze/zir/zim or he/his/him

 
Suggested blog readings: